[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 20, 1932

THE CRIPPLED CHILD VERSUS THE CHRONIC SICK OF MASSACHUSETTS: CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS

JAMA. 1932;99(8):609-612. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740600001001
Abstract

My original intention was to confine my observations to the problems of the care and education of the crippled child of Massachusetts.

As an exhaustive survey of this subject has not only been recently completed but presented in a remarkably clear report by the Massachusetts Department of Public Welfare, a report that could not fail to interest the medical profession and the general public as well, I will forego unnecessary repetition. I therefore desire to focus attention, first, on education and usefulness of the cripple, and, secondly, on the problem of the chronic sick.

After working for more than twenty-five years in orthopedic surgery, I am hopeful and optimistic for the constantly increasing interest in crippled children, their physical care, education and economic usefulness and the desire and interest on the part of society to give them a square deal with every opportunity for happiness.

The crippled child starts life

×