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Article
October 22, 1932

AN IMPROVED CONCENTRATION TEST OF RENAL FUNCTION

Author Affiliations

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

From the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School.

JAMA. 1932;99(17):1396-1398. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740690006002
Abstract

In a previous paper,1 the value of the specific gravity of the urine as a test of kidney function was discussed. It was pointed out that if the specific gravity of the urine is to be employed as a functional test, certain conditions must be fulfilled: First, a sufficient amount of solid wastes must be presented to the kidneys for excretion. This was obtained by a special diet. Second, the amount of water available for the excretion of these wastes must be limited. This condition was observed by restricting the fluid intake. The purpose of these conditions was to impose maximal strain on the kidneys and to secure the most concentrated urine possible.

Under these conditions it was found that normal individuals were able to concentrate the urine to a specific gravity of 1.026 or above. Diseased kidneys were unable to concentrate to 1.026. The more severe the renal

References
1.
Lashmet, F. H., and Newburgh, L. H.:  The Specific Gravity of the Urine as a Test of Kidney Function ,  J. A. M. A. 94: 1883 ( (June 14) ) 1930.Crossref
2.
Folin, Otto:  Laboratory Manual of Biological Chemistry , New York, D. Appleton & Co., 1923.
3.
Wiley, F. H., and Newburgh, L. H.:  An Improved Method for the Determination of Water Balance ,  J. Clin. Investigation 10:723 ( (Oct.) ) 1931.Crossref
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