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Article
November 26, 1932

DENTAL DISEASE IN HAWAII: V: CAN UNERUPTED TEETH DECAY?

Author Affiliations

HONOLULU, T. H.

From the Research Department of the Queen's Hospital.

JAMA. 1932;99(22):1849-1852. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740740033009
Abstract

In a recent paper1 Williams, for many years one of the foremost investigators in the field of dentistry, made the following statement: "One thing is plain beyond all controversy—decay of the human teeth will not be prevented until we have learned how to control the acid forming bacteria in the mouth. Remove the action of those organisms from the teeth and dental caries will cease, because a perfectly clean tooth cannot decay."

Dentists, physicians and research workers the world over for the past fifty years, at least, seem to have been unanimous in their opinion that the decay of human teeth is caused by acid products produced by bacteria in the oral cavity. Opinion has differed, however, as to the specific organisms responsible for the acid produced and as to how its formation could be prevented. If it is true that only acid formed by bacteria in the mouth

References
1.
Williams, L. J.:  The Decay of the Human Teeth: A Criticism ,  Dental Cosmos , (March) , 1932.
2.
Jones, Martha R.; Larsen, N. P., and Pritchard, G. P.:  Dental Cosmos 72: 439, 1930.
3.
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