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Article
January 10, 1948

ROLE OF TRANSFUSION IN THE ETIOLOGY OF ERYTHROBLASTOSIS: A Warning to Physicians

Author Affiliations

Baltimore

From the Department of Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

JAMA. 1948;136(2):79-81. doi:10.1001/jama.1948.02890190007002
Abstract

Since the role of the Rh factor and isoimmunization in the production of erythroblastosis was first pointed out by Levine1 and Wiener2 more than seven years ago, this phenomenon has been of great concern to the physician and layman alike. It is amazing that such widespread interest should be centered on a disease which is extremely rare, since clinically recognizable erythroblastosis fetalis probably does not occur in the usual obstetric clinic in more than 1 in 300 deliveries; and, inasmuch as the infant mortality from this disease is in the neighborhood of 50 per cent, it can be estimated that the chances of an infant dying from this condition are less than 1 in 600 deliveries. The theory enunciated by Levine is simple and straightforward. If an Rh-positive man is married to an Rh-negative woman, which combination makes up about 12 per cent of the marriages, the infant

References
1.
Levine, P., and Stetson, R. E.:  Unusual Case of Intra-Group Agglutination ,  J. A. M. A. 113: 126 ( (July 8) ) 1939.Crossref
2.
Wiener, A. S., and Peters, H. R.:  Ann. Int. Med. 13:2306, 1940.Crossref
3.
Landsteiner, K., and Wiener, H. S.:  Proc. Soc. Exper. Biol. & Med. 43:22, 1940.
4.
Levine, P., and Waller, R. K.:  Blood 1: 143, 1946.
5.
Diamond, L. K.:  New England J. Med. 232:475, 1945.
6.
The numbers following para indicate in order total pregnancies, full term infants, premature infants, abortions and living children.
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