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Article
April 24, 1987

Cholesterol and Mortality: 30 Years of Follow-up From the Framingham Study

Author Affiliations

From the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Framingham, Mass.

From the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Framingham, Mass.

JAMA. 1987;257(16):2176-2180. doi:10.1001/jama.1987.03390160062027
Abstract

From 1951 to 1955 serum cholesterol levels were measured in 1959 men and 2415 women aged between 31 and 65 years who were free of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. Under age 50 years, cholesterol levels are directly related with 30-year overall and CVD mortality; overall death increases 5% and CVD death 9% for each 10 mg/dL. After age 50 years there is no increased overall mortality with either high or low serum cholesterol levels. There is a direct association between falling cholesterol levels over the first 14 years and mortality over the following 18 years (11% overall and 14% CVD death rate increase per 1 mg/dL per year drop in cholesterol levels). Under age 50 years these data suggest that having a very low cholesterol level improves longevity. After age 50 years the association of mortality with cholesterol values is confounded by people whose cholesterol levels are falling—perhaps due to diseases predisposing to death.

(JAMA 1987;257:2176-2180)

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