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Article
July 27, 1984

Physicians and the Olympics

Author Affiliations

Office of the Director and Center for Health Promotion and Education Centers for Disease Control Atlanta

JAMA. 1984;252(4):529-530. doi:10.1001/jama.1984.03350040059026
Abstract

The Summer Olympic Games were last held in the United States in 1932, in Los Angeles. During the past 52 years, athletic performances have improved, and the composition of the Games has changed. The public, including physicians, have become increasingly interested in sports. And the ability of health professionals to prevent and treat sports-related injuries has greatly improved, and exercise as a health-promoting activity has become more widely accepted.

Evidence of the growing interest and concern of the medical community in the medical aspects of sport and exercise is provided by our participation in professional organizations and our literature. In 1954, the American College of Sports Medicine had 11 members; in 1983, there were 10,421 members, about a third of whom were physicians. Since 1930, the number of scientific journal articles pertaining to sports, fitness, and exercise has increased three times faster than the total number of medical articles and

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