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Article
August 17, 1912

INTRAMAMMARY INJECTIONS OF OXYGEN IN THE TREATMENT OF ECLAMPSIA

Author Affiliations

PATTERSON, LA.

JAMA. 1912;LIX(7):538-539. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270080220014
Abstract

In a recent editorial1 the similarity existing between the milk-fever of cows and eclampsia in women isdiscussed. It is considered first that the milk-fever of cattle is caused by the elaboration of a toxin, or toxins, in the udder of the animal, which on absorption are productive of the disease in question; the toxicity of colostrum when injected into the animal subcutaneously is spoken of in evidence. The likelihood of production of such toxins by a gland of such size as the udder, when brought suddenly into a state of intense activity following a period of more or less quiescence, is remarked on. It is stated also that "a therapeutic advance which has almost completely abolished the mortality from the disease (milk-fever in cows) and has greatly facilitated a speedy recovery,... consists in acute dilatation of the udder by means of suitable liquids or gases. Originally introduced on the

References
1.
 The Journal A. M. A. , (April 20) , p. 1201.
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