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Article
September 7, 1912

A CONTRIBUTION TO THE ETIOLOGY OF POLIOMYELITIS

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Neurology, University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College; Attending Neurologist, University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College Clinic; Bellevue Hospital Outpatient Department; St. Mark's Hospital Outpatient Department NEW YORK

JAMA. 1912;LIX(10):785-788. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270090029009
Abstract

The lesion of poliomyelitis confines itself mainly to the cerebrospinal system and produces focal clinical symptoms. This part of the human organism is rather remote from the external surface of the body and very tightly boxed in, as it were, and well protected from external influences. An infection, therefore, must primarily reach these tissues either through the circulatory or through the lymphatic system.

Experimentally, the disease was produced by injecting monkeys with the infected spinal cord and brain intracerebrally, intraperitoneally, by rubbing it into an abraded surface and an unabraded oneof the nasal mucosa, into the nerve-sheath and finally by rubbing it into an abraded surface of the skin. It was further shown that the nasal mucosa contains the virus quite early in the incubation period of the disease—three days after injection of the virus—and that the tonsils, the salivary glands, the retroperitoneal glands and lung tissue are infected as

References
1.
Flexner, Peabody and Draper;  The Journal A. M. A. , (Jan. 13) , 1912, p. 109.
2.
Neustaedter and Thro:  New York Med. Jour. , (Oct. 21) , 1911.
3.
Kling, Wernstedt and Pettersson:  Ztschr. f. Immunitätsf orsch. , 1912, xii, 316, 596.
4.
Lovett, R. W.:  Pediatrics , 1910, xii, 574.
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