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Article
September 21, 1912

THE SURGICAL TREATMENT OF EXOPHTHALMOS

Author Affiliations

ITHACA, N. Y.

JAMA. 1912;LIX(12):989-992. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04270090233037

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Abstract

In a somewhat large number of patients on whom I have operated for exophthalmic goiter during the past few years there have been many cases of extreme bulging of the eye. The exophthalmos is usually much improved and in some cases entirely disappears after partial thyroidectomy. As a rule, however, I have found it the most obstinate of the classical symptoms of goiter. The tachycardia and extreme nervousness which we see in so many of these cases usually clear up satisfactorily after operation, followed by prolonged rest, but once the exophthalmos has become extreme it is much less usual to see the eyes go back to normal.

INDICATIONS FOR OPERATION  The deformity is very noticeable and many women will eagerly accept any means of relief, operative or nonoperative, which can be offered. The disfigurement, however, is by no means the most important indication for operation in certain of these cases.

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