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Article
March 9, 1912

SPINAL DECOMPRESSION: REPORTS OF SEVEN CASES AND REMARKS ON THE DANGERS OF AND JUSTIFICATION FOR EXPLORATORY OPERATIONS

Author Affiliations

Physician to the Neurological Institute of New York; Surgeon to the Neurological Institute of New York NEW YORK

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(10):675-679. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260030075001
Abstract

We desire to call attention to the relief of symptoms which followed the removal of the spines and laminæ and the incision of the dura in seven cases of spinal disease.

The improvement in most of the cases was very striking, although in two the changes in symptoms which followed the operation could not be construed as benefits to the patient. In one patient, severe pain of three years' duration was promptly relieved; in another there was almost complete recovery from the symptoms of a lesion at the level of the eighth dorsal segment, an atypical Brown-Séquard syndrome with unilateral sensory loss and spastic motor palsy of both lower limbs (Case 2); in a third disappearance of an unilateral sensory and spastic motor paralysis of one leg (Case 3). In one Patient (Case 4) only temporary changes in the symptoms occurred; these were of physiologic interest, but without practical benefit

References
1.
Allen:  The Journal A. M. A. , (Sept. 9) , 1911, p. 878.
2.
Horsley, Sir Victor:  Brit. Med. Jour. , 1909, i, 513.Crossref
3.
 Jour. Nerv. and Ment. Dis. , (November) , 1911.
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