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Article
April 6, 1912

THE JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

JAMA. 1912;LVIII(14):1016-1019. doi:10.1001/jama.1912.04260040032020
Abstract

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[For other information see second page following reading matter]

SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 1912 

CHEESE—A NEGLECTED NUTRIENT  One of the most common articles of diet is cheese, and yet its value is little appreciated by the general public. One cannot say, in fairness, that cheese has not won favor in this country; for an article that is found in some quantity or other in almost every American home and the yearly output of which is considerably over 300,000,000 pounds in the United States, with a value of nearly $29,000,000, cannot be regarded as entirely unpopular.1 Despite these enormous figures, there is a prevalent current belief that cheese is prone to produce physiologic disturbances and that, as the expression goes, it is "hard to digest."Cheese enters into the dietary in two quite different ways.

References
1.
These and other data referred to are taken from Farmers' Bulletin 487. Langworthy, C. F., and Hunt, Caroline L.: Cheese and Its Economical Uses In the Diet, U. S. Dept. Agric, Washington, 1912.
2.
Glynn:  Quart. Jour. Med. , 1912, v, 157.
3.
Mayow, John:  Medicophysical Works , Alembic Club Reprints, No. 17, Chicago, 1908, p. 267.
4.
Cannon and Washburn:  An Explanation of Hunger ,  Am. Jour. Physiol. , 1912, xxix, 441.
5.
Cannon and Murphy:  Physiologic Observations on Experimentally Produced Ileus ,  The Journal A. M. A. , (Sept. 7) , 1907, p. 840.
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