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Editorial
July 2018

Blood Pressure Control—Much Has Been Achieved, Much Remains to Be Done

Author Affiliations
  • 1Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
  • 2Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
JAMA Cardiol. 2018;3(7):555-556. doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2018.1259

In this issue of JAMA Cardiology, Bundy and colleagues1 compare the effects of achieving the lower treatment blood pressure (BP) goals of the 2017 American College of Cardiologists/American Heart Association Hypertension Guideline (2017 guideline) with the effects of achieving the higher treatment goals of the 2014 Evidence-Based Hypertension Guideline (2014 guideline) using National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 2013 and 2016. They focus on differences between the 2 guidelines. This modeling exercise rests on the assumption of achieving 100% of guideline treatment goals. Under this assumption, they conclude that the 2017 guideline would reduce major cardiovascular (CVD) events (nonfatal strokes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular deaths) by 610 000 (23%) annually in US adults 40 years or older compared with 270 000 CVD events (10%) with full achievement of the 2014 guideline.

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