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Research Letter
December 2017

Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders and Skin-Restricted Lupus Remission: A Longitudinal Study

Author Affiliations
  • 1Service de Psychiatrie de l'Adulte A et Psychologie médicale, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Université Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France
  • 2Service de Psychiatrie de l'Adulte A et Psychologie médicale, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand, France
  • 3Service de Psychiatrie, CHU St-Etienne, University Jean Monnet, St-Etienne, France
  • 4Service de dermatologie, CHU Hopital Nord, Saint-Etienne, France
  • 5Direction de la Recherche Clinique et de l’Innovation, CHU Clermont Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand, France
  • 6Service de Dermatologie, CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Université Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France
JAMA Dermatol. 2017;153(12):1331-1332. doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2017.3590

Skin-restricted lupus erythematosus (SRL) comprises discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE), lupus tumidus (LT), and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE). We and others reported a high prevalence of psychiatric disorders (PD), often undertreated, in patients with SRL.1,2 However, the impact of PDs and psychotropic medications on skin disease outcome has not been described. Thus, we decided to investigate this relationship in a patient cohort over 2.5 years.

After providing written informed consent, 75 patients with DLE, LT, or SCLE, prospectively recruited, were assessed by a dermatologist and a psychiatrist every 6 months over 2.5 years. The dermatologist recorded whether the SRL was in remission as defined by the complete absence of inflammatory lesions. More details can be found in previous article.1 This study received approval from the local ethical review board.

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