Octocrylene, an Emerging Photoallergen | Allergy and Clinical Immunology | JAMA Dermatology | JAMA Network
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Observation
July 2010

Octocrylene, an Emerging Photoallergen

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Departments of Dermatology, University Hospital and University of Angers, Angers, France (Drs Avenel-Audran and Martin), University of Nantes, Nantes, France (Drs Dutartre and Bernier), University of Paris VII, Hôpital Saint Louis, Paris, France (Dr Jeanmougin), University of Montpellier, Montpellier, France (Drs Comte and Peyron), University of Rennes, Rennes, France (Dr Benkalfate), University of Caen, Caen, France (Dr Michel), University of Clermont-Ferrand, Clermont-Ferrand, France (Dr Ferrier-Lebouëdec), University of Besançon, Besançon, France (Dr Vigan), University of Grenoble, Grenoble, France (Dr Bourrain); Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Saint-Raphaël, Katholieke Universiteit, Leuven, Belgium (Dr Goossens); and Private Dermatologist, Montluçon, France (Dr Outtas).

Arch Dermatol. 2010;146(7):753-757. doi:10.1001/archdermatol.2010.132
Abstract

Background  Octocrylene is a new emerging photoallergen. We report and discuss 50 cases of photoallergic contact dermatitis from octocrylene use and/or positive photopatch test reactions to this UV filter and draw attention to the unexpected association in adults with a history of photoallergic contact dermatitis from ketoprofen.

Observations  Patients were divided in 3 groups: group A comprised 11 children; group B, 28 adults with a history of photoallergy from sunscreen products; and group C, 14 adults systematically tested with octocrylene because of a history of photoallergy from ketoprofen. All patients but 3 in group C had positive test reactions to octocrylene. Ten of 11 children in group A and 9 of 28 adults in group B had positive patch test reactions to octocrylene. One child in group A, the other 19 adults in group B, and 11 of 14 adults in group C had positive photopatch test reactions to octocrylene. All adults in group C and 24 of 28 adults in group B had a history of photoallergy from ketoprofen and positive patch test or photopatch test reactions to other allergens that are often positive in patients with photoallergy from ketoprofen, especially fragrance components.

Conclusions  Octocrylene appears to be a strong allergen leading to contact dermatitis in children and mostly photoallergic contact dermatitis in adults with an often-associated history of photoallergy from ketoprofen. Patients with photoallergy from ketoprofen frequently have positive photopatch test reactions to octocrylene. These patients need to be informed of sunscreen products not containing octocrylene, benzophenone-3, or fragrances.

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