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Article
January 1920

TWO UNUSUAL CASES OF RINGWORM, ONE OF THEM DUE TO A FUNGUS (TRICHOPHYTON ROSACEUM) PRODUCING PINK CULTURES

Author Affiliations

Professor of Dermatology in the University of Pennsylvania PHILADELPHIA

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1920;1(1):1-7. doi:10.1001/archderm.1920.02350010004001
Abstract

Although the monumental work of Sabouraud and his followers has thrown a flood of light on the whole subject of ringworm in the past twenty-five years, this light has shone chiefly for the dermatologist and in some instances apparently rather dimly for him. The general practitioner still gropes in Cimmerian darkness; for him ringworm is still nothing more than bald, scaly patches on the scalps of children or scaly rings on the non-hairy surfaces; eczematoid ringworm and the deep inflammatory trichophytoses of animal origin do not exist for him — they are a terra incognita whose borders he has not even seen, let alone entered on. It is only by the persistent reporting the less common forms of the disease that we can hope to teach him that infection by the trichophyton and other nearly related fungi may produce cutaneous diseases with widely varying symptoms presenting none of the clinical

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