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Article
December 1920

THE RESISTANCE (OR IMMUNITY) DEVELOPED BY THE REACTION TO SYPHILITIC INFECTION: AND SOME OF THE EFFECTS OF THE SUPPRESSION OF THIS REACTION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Laboratories of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, New York.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1920;2(6):675-678. doi:10.1001/archderm.1920.02350120003001

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Abstract

The idea of an inhibitory influence has been suggested as a means of explaining certain phenomena of syphilitic infections and there is some experimental evidence on which to base such a conception. The difficulty has been that most of the evidence cited in support of this theory was susceptible of more than one interpretation. This applies in particular to reinoculation and superinfection experiments which have been the favorite means of demonstrating inhibitory effects. Nowhere, however, is the action of such an influence more strongly suggested than in the experimental infection produced in the rabbit by scrotal or testicular inoculations of well adapted strains of Spirochaeta pallida.

As it is ordinarily seen, the two most striking features of this infection are an extremely marked reaction at the site of inoculation and a total absence of generalized manifestations of disease. If one considers these peculiarities of the experimental infection as compared with

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