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Article
May 1921

SUSCEPTIBILITY TO DERMATITIS FROM RHUS DIVERSILOBA

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1921;3(5):625-633. doi:10.1001/archderm.1921.02350180051006
Abstract

The word "immunity" is used in this article to designate the effective resistance of the organism against the principal, or most active, irritant in Rhus diversiloba. A high degree of immunity, therefore, designates a low degree of susceptibility and vice versa. Immunity is generally used to designate a low degree of susceptibility toward foreign protein. As the irritant poison of Rhus diversiloba is not a protein, the term is used in this paper to denote a natural or acquired resistance toward nonprotein substances, such as occurs with alcohol, chloroform, ether, atropin, cocain and opium. In this terminology, immunity includes what is commonly known as tolerance.

Judging by the evidence at present at hand, there seem to be two forms of immunity—natural and acquired.

NATURAL IMMUNITY  According to Kolmer, natural immunity is the resistance to infection normally possessed, usually as the result of inheritance, by certain persons or species under natural

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