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Article
November 1923

DERMATOSCOPY: A STUDY OF BLOOD VESSEL FORM AND ARRANGEMENT IN VARIOUS DERMATOSES.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1923;8(5):603-618. doi:10.1001/archderm.1923.02360170008002
Abstract

In a previous article on this subject recording preliminary observations, I1 wrote "that the dermatoscope offers a method of examination, which falling mid-way between ordinary visual and microscopic examination, contains something of each and adds something of its own." It adds to the other means of diagnosis the ability to scrutinize the living epidermis and superficial region of the derma under comparatively high magnification.

The dermatoscope reveals directly only three constituents of the skin: (1) the horny layer with the epidermal portion of the sweat gland ducts and hair follicles; (2) pigment, and (3) the blood vessels. At times, it is possible to infer the presence of other components and changes in the skin, such as edema and infiltration, by peculiarities in the appearance of the directly revealed constituents, in particular of the blood vessels.

The most striking feature of the dermatoscopic picture is the blood vessels. They appear

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