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Article
February 1924

A CASE OF DIFFUSE SCLERODERMA PRESENTING UNUSUAL FEATURES

Author Affiliations

Professor of Dermatology, University of Vermont; Attending Physician, New York Skin and Cancer Hospital NEW YORK

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1924;9(2):187-207. doi:10.1001/archderm.1924.02360200043003
Abstract

The etiology and pathogenesis of the so-called idiopathic scleroses and atrophies of the skin is still such a mystery, and the classification is in many ways so unsatisfactory, that the record of a case which presents such a variety of symptoms as occurred in the patient about to be described may be of interest and perhaps of value.

REPORT OF A CASE 

History.—  E. G., an American girl, aged 12, was admitted to the New York Skin and Cancer Hospital on Oct. 26, 1922, with a diagnosis of scleroderma. The family history was negative for tuberculosis and syphilis. The patient had had scarlet fever when about 4 years of age, with uneventful recovery, and measles in May, 1918, when about 7½ years old. Soon after recovery from measles, the patient said, she had a sore mouth, involving the buccal and labial mucous membrane, and lasting about two weeks. This seems

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