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Article
February 1924

THE VALUE OF THE KAHN PRECIPITATION TEST IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF PRIMARY SYPHILIS AND ITS ADAPTATION TO LOCAL FLUIDS

Author Affiliations

CHARLOTTE, N. C.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1924;9(2):208-218. doi:10.1001/archderm.1924.02360200064004
Abstract

The early diagnosis of primary syphilis is universally recognized as of prime importance in the treatment and prognosis of the disease. The appearance of the lesion, the character of the discharge and the presence or absence of induration are all important clinical findings, yet they are not infallible in the establishment of a positive diagnosis. A demonstration of Spirochaeta pallida in the fluid from the sore has been until recently the only positive criterion at the disposal of the clinician. In many instances these organisms cannot be demonstrated, due either to the fact that the lesion has been treated or that it is complicated by chancroidal infection. In rare instances examination of the untreated, uncomplicated lesion fails to reveal the organisms even on repeated search. A positive diagnosis, therefore, of a suspicious lesion, is often fraught with many difficulties. Any method that will aid in the establishment of a definite

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