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Article
February 1924

COMPARATIVE SPIROCHETICIDAL ACTIVITY OF SALTS OF METALS NOT HERETOFORE STUDIED IN THE TREATMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL RABBIT SYPHILIS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Research Institute of Cutaneous Medicine, Philadelphia.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1924;9(2):219-230. doi:10.1001/archderm.1924.02360200075005
Abstract

It is a significant fact that the known spirocheticidal drugs— arsenic, antimony, vanadium and bismuth—are in the same group (V) of the periodic arrangement of the elements. Indeed, with the exception of mercury, all the known spirocheticidal drugs1 are in this group. Although this fact suggested for a long time possible spirocheticidal action of other metals in the same group, and the only remaining common one was bismuth, it was not until 1916 that Sauton and Robert2 demonstrated spirocheticidal activity of bismuth in Spirochaeta gallinarum infection in chickens, and Sazerac and Levaditi3 in 1921, spirocheticidal activity in experimental syphilis.

In this study the salts of other metals, particularly heavy metals, were studied for spirocheticidal action in experimental syphilis in rabbits. The following salts of these metals were employed: gold chlorid, thorium chlorid, platinum chlorid, barium chlorid, cadmium iodid, cerium nitrate, strontium nitrate, calcium chlorid, tin chlorid, zinc sulphate,

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