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Article
March 1924

A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE HISTOLOGIC CHANGES PRODUCED EXPERIMENTALLY IN THE LIVER AND KIDNEYS OF THE RAT BY ARSPHENAMIN AND NEO-ARSPHENAMIN

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Research Institute for Cutaneous Medicine of Philadelphia and the McManes Laboratory of Pathology of the University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1924;9(3):321-339. doi:10.1001/archderm.1924.02360210030003
Abstract

Following the studies of Pearce and Brown1 on the pathologic changes induced in the kidneys and suprarenal glands of experimental animals by various arsenical compounds, we published detailed reports of our studies on the histopathologic changes produced in various organs of rats and rabbits by the intravenous injection of solutions of arsphenamin, neo-arsphenamin and mercury.2

The most pronounced changes were observed after the intravenous injection of large amounts of both compounds; multiple injections of amounts comparable to doses administered to human beings according to body weight produced only slight changes of minor importance. But amounts commonly injected intravenously in conducting the required standard toxicity tests in rats, namely, 0.1 gm. of arsphenamin in alkaline solution and 0.2 gm. of neo-arsphenamin in water per kilogram of body weight, produced profound pathologic changes, particularly in the liver, kidneys and suprarenal glands. These doses were of course from 10.6 to 15.5

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