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Article
June 1924

THE TREATMENT OF PSORIASIS WITH INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS OF SODIUM SALICYLATE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the department of dermatology, University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1924;9(6):752-755. doi:10.1001/archderm.1924.02360240079004
Abstract

As in every disease of unknown cause, there are many different methods of treatment for psoriasis. Most of these consist of local applications of ointments which, if not exceedingly irritating to the skin and destructive of fabrics with which they come into contact, are at least unpleasant because of the constant presence of greasy material on the skin and clothes. Any method of treatment, therefore, that does away with these unpleasant features would, if successful, be hailed with delight by the unhappy victim of this persistent affection.

Favorable reports by several dermatologists on the use of sodium salicylate intravenously seemed to point to a method of treatment that might be of decided benefit in many cases of the disease.

Sodium salicylate and especially salicin, administered by mouth, has been strongly recommended by Crocker and others. Some good results have been claimed for its use, both in cases with and without

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