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Article
July 1924

TOXICITY AND REACTIONS CAUSED BY ARSPHENAMIN AND NEO-ARSPHENAMIN: THE EFFECT OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS OF ARSENIC, MERCURY AND BISMUTH ON THE KIDNEYS OF ANIMALS, JUDGED BY THE NONPROTEIN NITROGEN AND UREA CONTENT OF THE BLOOD

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Dermatological Research Laboratories, Philadelphia.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1924;10(1):1-13. doi:10.1001/archderm.1924.02360250022001
Abstract

The purpose of the investigation the results of which are described in this paper, was to discover what symptomatic effects, if any, various doses of arsphenamin, neo-arsphenamin and organic compounds of mercury and bismuth had on the renal function of animals.

One phase of this problem has already been amply covered by the researches of Drs. J. A. Kolmer and B. Lucke,1 who made a study of the histologic changes produced experimentally in rabbits by the arsenicals and various compounds of mercury named above. In their necropsy examinations, animals treated with one large dose of arsphenamin showed "severe vascular and tissue alterations, particularly in the liver, kidney, suprarenals and spleen"; those injected with a "single massive dose of neo-arsphenamin produced vascular injury, cellular degenerations and necrosis similar to but less severe than those produced by arsphenamin," while all mercurials employed caused tissue changes in all the organs examined.

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