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Article
July 1924

A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE HERROLD PRECIPITATION TEST AND THE WASSERMANN REACTION

Author Affiliations

Research Fellow in Dermatology (James Nevins Hyde Memorial Fund); Assistant Professor, Department of Dermatology, and Chief of the Clinic for Syphilis, Rush Medical College, University of Chicago CHICAGO

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1924;10(1):36-41. doi:10.1001/archderm.1924.02360250057003
Abstract

Since the advent of the precipitation tests for syphilis, several papers have appeared giving the results of the various modifications of the test as compared with the Wassermann test.

A clinical study of a sufficient number of cases tested by one of the new methods and checked by a routine Wassermann test should be of value. This was accomplished by using the routine Wassermann test at the Central Free Dispensary from Nov. 27, 1922, to July 26, 1923. In the study of this wide range of material, certain principles of value were established.

The Wassermann test was run with a cholesterolized antigen and an acetone-insoluble antigen. Only three degrees of hemolysis are recorded: (1) complete inhibition of hemolysis + ++, (2) moderate inhibition of hemolysis ++, (3) slight inhibition of hemolysis +.

The Herrold1 modification was adopted as a precipitation test. We used the alcoholic extract of beef heart after a preliminary ether

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