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Article
July 1924

OSSIFYING SARCOMA OF THE SKIN METASTATIC FROM OSSIFYING SARCOMA OF THE HUMERUS

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1924;10(1):56-62. doi:10.1001/archderm.1924.02360250077005

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Abstract

True bone formation, as well as calcification, has been recorded in a few instances as occurring in the skin at the sites of preexisting cutaneous lesions and trauma, supposedly the result of metaplasia.

Two or three instances are also on record in which bone tumors, single and multiple, developed independently in the skin of young persons, probably as the result of growth of misplaced embryonal cells.

The case herein reported is one of true bone formation in the skin, the result of metastasis of an ossifying sarcoma of the upper end of the right hunierus. An exhaustive study of the literature revealed no similar illustration. Cases were reported in which the primary ossifying tumor involved the skin only by direct extension. Sarcomas of the skin of various types, primary and secondary, are not extremely unusual, but apparently there is no other instance in which ossification has been noted, although several

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