[Skip to Navigation]
Article
August 1924

MYCOSIS FUNGOIDES: REPORT OF THREE CASES OF THE TUMOR D'EMBLÉE TYPE

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1924;10(2):183-202. doi:10.1001/archderm.1924.02360260046005
Abstract

Mycosis fungoides is a chronic, malignant disease which develops gradually. In its earliest stages it is characterized by superficial inflammatory lesions of an erythematous, eczematoid or urticarial type, later by irregular thickening and infiltration of the skin with the subsequent formation of nodular growths, which frequently ulcerate and form mushroom-like tumors. The disease, as we usually see it, occurs in three distinct stages, the first stage characterized by lesions of a superficial type, the second by lesions showing more or less infiltration, and the third by tumors and large, mushroom-like ulcerations.

Kaposi,1 in 1887, divided the disease into two classes or types: Type I: A form characterized by limited tumor formation and preceded for many years by various more or less generalized, scaly, papular or erythematous disorders of the skin, resembling eczema, lichen or urticaria, associated with frequent and severe itching of agonizing severity, with burning and pricking sensations,

×