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Article
October 1924

POSTMORTEM FINDINGS IN THE SPINAL CORD IN TWO CASES OF CHRONIC PEMPHIGUS

Author Affiliations

Attending Neurologist and Neuropathologist, Montefiore Hospital; Assistant Neurologist, Bellevue Hospital NEW YORK

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1924;10(4):424. doi:10.1001/archderm.1924.02360280018003
Abstract

It has been suggested at various times that the lesions of chronic pemphigus depended upon a lesion of the central or peripheral nervous system. Literature on the subject1 is scanty. Darier states that the nervous system is not involved.

The following is a brief record of the findings in the spinal cord in two cases: There were no pathologic changes found in the nerve cells, connective tissue cells, blood vessels, roots or meninges in the sections examined, at the cervical, thoracic and lumbar levels. The methods of Marchi, Weigert and Mallory were used.

Case 1.—  M. F., a Russian Jew, a tailor, whose family history and past history were irrelevant, became ill in March, 1913, nine years before death, which occurred, April 26, 1922. The initial symptoms were itching about the shoulders and the subsequent appearance of blisters over the entire body. These soon showed crusting and scaling, followed

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