[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 1924

STUDIES IN IMMUNITY IN RINGWORM INFECTIONS: II. ACTIVE INDUCED IMMUNITY

Author Affiliations

Associate Professor of Dermatology and Syphilology, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine PHILADELPHIA

From the Research Institute for Cutaneous Medicine, Philadelphia, Pa.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1924;10(4):462-470. doi:10.1001/archderm.1924.02360280056009
Abstract

In the literature, there are diverse views concerning the induction of an active immunity against ringworm in both man and the lower animals. This, to some degree, appears to depend on variation in the antigenic substance (simple vaccines, fungus extracts) used by the various experimenters.

Aside from its academic interest, this question of an active induced immunity involves two important clinical problems, namely, prophylaxis and treatment. Of the two, that of treatment appears to be the most important, since it is almost always possible, at least in institutions, to isolate infected children, the common sufferers with ringworm, particularly of the scalp. From the standpoint of treatment, the divergence of opinions concerns the ability of these authors to induce an active immunity not only in deep but also in superficial ringworm infections. It should be noted, however, that the majority are in more or less agreement respecting the value of these

×