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Article
November 1924

EFFECTS OF NONSPECIFIC PROTEIN THERAPY IN SYPHILIS: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO ITS CUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Medicine, clinic of Dr. Jay Frank Schamberg.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1924;10(5):551-556. doi:10.1001/archderm.1924.02360290016003
Abstract

Nonspecific therapy has been successfully applied in many fields of medicine, and the list of diseases which are favorably influenced by this type of treatment constantly increases. It has proved of value in the treatment of acute infections, such as typhoid fever, anthrax, diphtheria, erysipelas, pneumonia, scarlet fever, smallpox, typhus fever and septicemia; in arthritis; in gonorrhea and its complications; in various dermatologic conditions including psoriasis, exfoliative dermatitis, furunculosis, eczema, etc.; in diseases of the eye, such as uveitis, panophthalmitis, iritis, pneumococcic corneal ulcers and keratitis; and in such miscellaneous conditions as angioneurotic edema, secondary anemia and disorders of the blood, such as purpura. In recent years attention has been called to the beneficial effects following protein therapy in general paralysis and tabes, and Kryle1 in 1917, reported favorably on the effect of combined protein and the usual antisyphilitic medication in reducing persistently positive Wassermann reactions to negatives.

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