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May 1925

TRYPARSAMIDE IN THE TREATMENT OF NEUROSYPHILIS: A STUDY BASED ON OBSERVATION OF 152 PATIENTS FOR EIGHTEEN MONTHS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA; NEW YORK

From the Section of Dermatology and Syphilology, Mayo Clinic, and the Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minn.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1925;11(5):579-610. doi:10.1001/archderm.1925.02370050002001
Abstract

To those who find themselves obliged to combat daily the obstinacies of neurosyphilis as a therapeutic problem, the development of a new and promising approach must always be welcome. Such an approach and such promise is found in the drug tryparsamide, N-phenyl-glycinamide-para-arsonic acid, prepared by Jacobs and Heidelberger1 of the Rockefeller Institute, and suggested as suitable for the treatment of certain aspects of syphilis, especially of the nervous system, by Brown.2 At the hands, first, of Lorenz, Loevenhart, Bleckwenn and Hodges,3 and subsequently of Moore, Robinson and Keidel,4 this compound has received a carefully controlled clinical trial in the treatment of neurosyphilis, special attention being given to the risk of toxic action on the optic mechanism, which was foreshadowed by Pearce5 in her use of the drug in the treatment of South African sleeping sickness.

GENERAL RESULTS BY STANDARD METHODS IN NEUROSYPHILIS  It would

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