[Skip to Navigation]
Article
July 1925

STUDIES ON HAIR: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO HYPERTRICHOSIS

Author Affiliations

Professor of Anatomy, Stanford Medical School, Leland Stanford Jr. University Stanford University, Calif.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1925;12(1):76-94. doi:10.1001/archderm.1925.02370070089010
Abstract

IV. REGIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF HUMAN HAIR  The hairy regions of the body are covered at one time or another by down of the character already described (Fig. 38). In its typical form, this down is essentially the same as the primary hair of the fetus, and ontogenetically, although probably not phylogenetically, precedes all other types of hair. The tendency, which is widespread among mammals, for hairs to occur in groups is well exemplified by human down in which groups of three are common and groups of five occasional. In these clusters, one hair is almost invariably larger than the others. In view of its central position as well as its size, it is probable that the large hair is produced by the oldest follicle in the group. The significance of these hair groups and their physiologic and probable morphologic relation to sweat glands is a subject that requires much further

Add or change institution
×