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Article
December 1925

FUSIFORM BACILLI AND SPIROCHETES: XII. OCCURRENCE IN GANGRENOUS LESIONS OF FINGERS: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Cook County Hospital and the Department of Pathology and Bacteriology, University of Illinois, College of Medicine, Chicago.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1925;12(6):837-839. doi:10.1001/archderm.1925.02370120067005
Abstract

In previous studies,1 it was pointed out that putrid infections were often caused by fusiform bacilli and spirochetes, and their source was related to the distribution of these bacteria on the human body. A rare and striking lesion is the gangrenous infection of the finger resulting from injury inflicted by teeth about which these anaerobes are found normally. Hultgen2 reported such a lesion containing these organisms in a girl, aged 7, who had the habit of biting her finger nails. Peters3 described two instances as a result of fists striking teeth. The first man injured his index and middle finger, where foul, discharging ulcers formed. In these lesions fusiform bacilli and streptococci but no spirochetes were demonstrated. In the second, the foul pus discharged from the left little finger from an irregular, ragged ulcer for eighteen days. The bacilli and spirochetes were observed first and later a

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