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Article
April 1927

ATLANTIC DERMATOLOGICAL CONFERENCE: NEW YORK, NEW ENGLAND, PHILADELPHIA, AND BALTIMOREWASHINGTON DERMATOLOGICAL SOCIETIES

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1927;15(4):496-506. doi:10.1001/archderm.1927.02370280112009

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Abstract

Lymphangioma Circumscriptum. Presented by Dr. Boardman.  A white girl, aged 8, born in America, had had hard, colorless, deep-seated vesicles, one-sixteenth to one-eighth inch (0.15 to 0.31 cm.) in diameter, for four or five years, on the left side of the chest. These vesicles were slightly brownish, of normal skin color. There were also a few warty, brown, soft tumors. A biopsy led to a diagnosis of lymphangiectasis. The lesions had been treated with carbon dioxide snow, and were disappearing under treatment.

DISCUSSION  Dr. Fraser, New York: I believe that lymphangioma circumscriptum is not the proper term for this condition, in the sense that there is here a new growth, and that the condition should be described as lymphangiectasis.

Hydroa Aestivale. Presented by Dr. Boardman.  A white American school girl, aged 9, for the past six years had had lesions which began as hemorrhagic blebs one-eighth to one-quarter inch (0.31

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