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Article
November 1927

THE TEETH IN CASES OF CONGENITAL SYPHILIS: ROENTGEN-RAY STUDIES OF UNERUPTED TEETH

Author Affiliations
MERIDEN, CONN.
Arch Derm Syphilol. 1927;16(5):605-610. doi:10.1001/archderm.1927.02380050069006
Abstract

The first contribution to medical literature on the subject of dental dystrophies in congenital syphilis was that of Hutchinson, who described the upper central incisors in 1857. He depicted them as being peg-shaped and showing a cresentic notch on their incisal edge. He declared that this deformity was characteristic and was to be considered pathognomonic evidence of congenital syphilis. His views were vigorously contested by Parrot, who saw in them only evidence of rachitis, and by Magitot, who described a similar condition in the jaw of a cow, due to eclampsia.

In 1884, Moon described the hypoplastic first molar, which he likewise attributed to congenital syphilis.

In 1908, Cavallaro1 of Florence, Italy, published an extensive article in Dental Cosmos, in which he purports to show that dentification of the first molar begins about the sixth month of fetal life and that of the incisor the first month after birth.

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