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Article
January 1929

SKIN DISEASES OF ENDOCRINE ORIGIN (DYSHORMONAL DERMATOSES): POIKILODERMA-LIKE CHANGES IN CONNECTION WITH UNDERDEVELOPMENT OF THE SEXUAL GLANDS AND DYSTROPHIA ADIPOSOGENITALIS

Author Affiliations

ZURICH, SWITZERLAND

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1929;19(1):22-34. doi:10.1001/archderm.1929.02380190025002
Abstract

Dermatologists have always shown particular interest in skin diseases the pathogenesis of which is related to the entire organism or to definite changes of the internal organs. Such relationships, either to intermediate metabolism or to disturbances of particular internal organs, have always been sought. The developments of the last few years have shown that the endocrine glands oftenest deserve consideration in this respect. This is entirely comprehensible, for there is no doubt that endocrine functions strongly influence even the normal physiologic development of the skin.

In looking over the tremendous amount of literature which has accumulated through the years in this field, we are, however, astonished to note the preponderance of hypotheses over the relatively few facts. We know that in Addison's disease a hyperpigmentation of the skin and mucous membranes is caused by the destruction of the suprarenal glands. It is also known that a causal relationship exists between insufficiency of the thyroid and myxedema of the skin, and that, especially in women, disturbances of the sexual apparatus can cause eruptions on the skin. Though it is impossible to say which particular gland is primarily affected, such relationships are, moreover, probable in several other skin syndromes

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