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Article
January 1929

MERCURIC SALICYLATE: A STUDY OF ITS EXCRETION IN THE TREATMENT OF SYPHILIS

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology of the School of Medicine of the Western Reserve University and of the Lakeside Hospital and from the Department of Pharmacology of the School of Medicine of the Western Reserve University.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1929;19(1):105-118. doi:10.1001/archderm.1929.02380190108009
Abstract

Mercuric salicylate was first recommended as a syphilitic remedy in 1887 by Silva Arranjo of Brazil. Because of its comparative painlessness by intramuscular injection, its use spread rapidly, so that it has probably been more widely employed than any other preparation of mercury. Moreover, it has been a comparatively safe remedy as compared with other salts of this metal. Study of the 108 fatalities reported as resulting from the use of mercury from 1883 to 19011 shows that 7 of the deaths were from soluble injections and 78 from insoluble injections of different mercurials. Mercurial oil was the cause of 31 of these, mild mercurous chloride of 8, and although mercuric salicylate was probably used far more than any other, it was the cause of only ten deaths. Lomholt says that during his experience two deaths have resulted from the use of this salt. In our clinic at Cleveland

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