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Article
August 1929

TUBERCLE OF CARABELLI: ITS SIGNIFICANCE IN CONGENITAL SYPHILIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, Service of Dr. George M. MacKee.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1929;20(2):221-230. doi:10.1001/archderm.1929.01440020073013
Abstract

The tubercle of Carabelli, which was first described in 1844 by Dr. Georg Carabelli Edlen von Lunkaszprie, professor of dental surgery at the Academy of Petrograd, is a supernumerary tubercle found on the median side of the first permanent molars. During the past few years, there has been some discussion regarding the relationship of this malformation on the teeth to congenital syphilis. Sabouraud of Paris, Parounagian of New York, and Jane firmly believe that the tubercle of Carabelli is a stigma of congenital syphilis, of the same diagnostic importance as hutchinsonian notched teeth. Other observers, among whom may be mentioned Sprawson of London, Stokes of Philadelphia and Hazen of Washington, hold the opinion that this condition may also occur in nonsyphilitic persons; when it is found in persons having congenital syphilis, they believe it to be merely a coincidence.

While Hutchinson1 regarded the notched malformation of the upper central

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