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Article
September 1929

DIPLEGIA FACIALIS IN EARLY SYPHILIS: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

Associate Attending in Dermatology and Syphilology at the New York Post-Graduate Hospital NEW HAVEN, CONN.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1929;20(3):306-314. doi:10.1001/archderm.1929.01440030032003
Abstract

While reports of many cases of paralysis of both seventh cranial nerves are finding their way into the literature at present, this condition is almost exclusively due to a multiple neuritis or to trauma. Paralysis of one or more of the cranial nerves is not uncommon in early or late syphilis, but the early involvement of both facial nerves is rare enough to warrant the reporting of an additional case.

A careful search of the available literature discloses a total of thirty-seven cases of diplegia facialis in syphilis. Twenty-three of these cases may be said to be in association with early cases of syphilis, six with undoubtedly late cases and the remaining eight with cases of syphilis in which it is impossible to ascertain the stage of the disease.

Jonathan Hutchinson1 stated that "A remarkable point in reference to the influence of syphilis on the cranial nerves is the

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