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Article
September 1929

VINCENT'S ANGINA: A CASE OCCURRING DURING ANTISYPHILITIC TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

ATLANTA, GA.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1929;20(3):322. doi:10.1001/archderm.1929.01440030048006
Abstract

Lesions due to, or characterized by the presence of, Vincent's organism—a long, slender spirillum found in symbiosis with a large fusiform bacillus—are undoubtedly surface infections in nearly all instances. Nevertheless, arsphenamine is given intravenously for the condition, as well as applied as pastes to the ulcers, and this method of treatment is endorsed frequently in the literature on the subject. The spirocheticidal properties of the arsphenamines are doubtless responsible for this therapy, but since Vincent's organism responds readily to other less dangerous and decidedly less expensive drugs, it seems that a case of infection with Vincent's organism which occurred during and in spite of arsphenamine therapy for syphilis merits reporting.

REPORT OF CASE  Miss L. M., a white prostitute, aged 21, seen on Feb. 8, 1927, was found to be suffering from a chancroid of the fourchet for which local applications were used with success. She had recently been delivered

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