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Article
November 1929

MADUROMYCOSIS: A CONTRIBUTION TO THE STUDY OF MADUROMYCOSIS, WITH REPORT OF A CASE OF INFECTION WITH ASPERGILLUS NIDULANS

Author Affiliations

MADISON, WIS.

From the Departments of Clinical Medicine and Dermatology of the University of Wisconsin, State of Wisconsin General Hospital.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1929;20(5):642-664. doi:10.1001/archderm.1929.01440050052005
Abstract

Since the time of Gill, in 1842, certain parasitic agents belonging to the higher fungi have been described as invaders of the tissues of man and animals. These infections have a tendency to originate in the subcutaneous tissues and to spread by contiguity to adjacent structures. They are characterized by the formation of granulomatous tumors which tend to break down, the resulting discharge containing colored granules or grains made up, at least in part, of fungus elements.

Before the time of Gill these fungus lesions were not definitely differentiated from such other conditions as caused deformity by enlargement such as the various causes of elephantiasis. Something of the nature of the condition was known, however, for such names as "Gootloo Mahdee" (because of the egglike swellings) and "Kirinagras" (dwelling place of worms) had been used by the natives1 in Ballory and in Rajputana, India, respectively. Then, too, in 1712,

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