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Article
February 1930

ETHYL IODIDE INHALATIONS IN THE TREATMENT OF MYCOTIC INFECTIONS OF THE SKIN AND ALLIED CONDITIONS

Author Affiliations

Dermatologist, Beth Israel Hospital; Assistant in Dermatology, Harvard Medical School; Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Director of Medical Research, Beth Israel Hospital; BOSTON

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1930;21(2):182-185. doi:10.1001/archderm.1930.01440080022004
Abstract

Iodides have been used for years in the treatment for blastomycosis, sporotrichosis and the like. The usual method of administration has been oral. More recently, the intravenous route has been resorted to. In view of the comparatively great loss of the drug when given orally and the rather varied results reported when given intravenously, we attempted to find a more direct means of getting the iodides to the affected areas. In addition, the fact that it is the belief of some, ourselves included,1 that a number of mycotic infections are not simply local but hematogenous, caused us to seek a means whereby iodides could be introduced directly into the arterial blood. A simple way of doing this is to cause the patient to inhale some volatile iodide, such as ethyl iodide.

Ethyl iodide was chosen because of certain advantages which it offered. Ethyl iodide has been used extensively for

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