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Article
February 1930

HISTOLOGIC DIFFERENCES IN A "SYRINGOMA" OF THE FACE AND SHOULDER: EMPLOYMENT OF WAX RECONSTRUCTION

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Laboratory of Dermatological Research, University of Pennsylvania.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1930;21(2):279-293. doi:10.1001/archderm.1930.01440080119013
Abstract

Every dermatologist is familiar with the group of multiple benign epithelioma-like tumors that occur on the face and chest, and that are notorious for a diversified nomenclature. Benign cystic epithelioma, epithelioma adenoides cysticum, syringoma and other tumors are sufficient to conjure up a long series of dermatologic investigations, ranging from the time of Kaposi1 in 1891, to that of Paul and Inglis2 in 1927. By this time it would appear that the subject had crystallized, or nearly crystallized, at least to the extent of establishing two categories of lesions as seen histologically, and two others which might, but less certainly, be distinguished clinically. The effort has been made to correlate these two, and today there seems to be a general belief that the disease with a predilection for the chest, among other symptoms, is likely to show the histology, more or less, of the sweat apparatus (syringoma), whereas

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