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Article
August 1930

FUNGISTASIS IN RINGWORM OF THE TOES AND OF THE FEET: I. SALICYLIC AND BENZOIC ACIDS

Author Affiliations

Assistant Medical Adviser and Assistant Professor of Hygiene, Cornell University; Assistant, Medical Advisers' Offices, Cornell University ITHACA, N. Y.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1930;22(2):225-231. doi:10.1001/archderm.1930.01440140027002
Abstract

Undoubtedly the most common sites of dermatophytosis in adolescents and adults are the feet and the toes, where the lesions appear on the plantar and dorsal surfaces, interdigitally and in the nail substance. At least three types of lesions have been recognized in these localities: the dry, scaly, eczematoid type, which in acute exacerbations becomes moist and erythematous (possibly because of secondary bacterial invasion); the sodden macerated "soft-corn" type with cracking of the skin, and the acute vesicular type with hyperkeratosis. Hulsey and Jordan1 found a clinical incidence for ringworm of the toes of 67 per cent and a microscopic incidence of 49 per cent in a group of 100 students. Weidman2 stated "... there is always an abundance of toe ringworm material available...." Sharp and Taylor3 indicated the prevalence of interdigital ringworm in the South, Canada and Texas and at the University of Chicago.

It is believed

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