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Article
September 1930

HODGKIN'S DISEASE OF THE SKIN: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology, Cornell University Medical College.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1930;22(3):389-394. doi:10.1001/archderm.1930.01440150015002
Abstract

Eruptions of the skin occur at some time during the course of Hodgkin's disease in 25 per cent of the cases. In about 10 per cent, the cutaneous manifestations are the first symptom.

Cole1 enumerates these dermatoses according to the frequence of their appearance as follows: "pruritus, prurigo-like eruptions, urticaria, edematous swellings, pigmentation, diffuse exfoliating erythrodermia, outbursts of perspiration, alopecia, dryness of the skin, hyperkeratosis, icterus, purpuric lesions and red or bluish tumors of the skin, which, on being opened, have a bloody, serous fluid and tissue typical of Hodgkin's disease."

Most of these lesions are of toxic origin, and their histology in no way aids in diagnosis. A few of them, however, show the typical microscopic picture of Hodgkin's disease. In 1920, Fox2 reviewed the literature, and in reporting such a case accepted ten others as proved Hodgkin's disease of the skin. Miller,3 in 1928, added

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