[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
January 1931

INTESTINAL FLORA IN PSORIASIS: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology and the Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Cornell University Medical College.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1931;23(1):70-73. doi:10.1001/archderm.1931.03880190073006
Abstract

Many theories as to the cause of psoriasis have been proposed, but none has found general acceptance. Its etiology at present is so obscure that it would seem desirable to continue investigating the condition from every aspect, with the hope that a promising lead may develop in one or another of the methods of approach. Apparently little or no attention has hitherto been given to the character of the intestinal flora in this disease. It would seem possible that it might harbor some organism or organisms that produce a toxin acting on the skin, or there might be a sensitization to or allergy toward the protein of certain intestinal organisms. That such sensitiveness may occur is suggested by the recent observations of Famulener and Davis in regard to skin reactions following intradermal injections of vaccines prepared from intestinal bacteria. They found that organisms belonging to the B. coli group gave

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×