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Article
February 1931

DERMATITIS DUE TO SENSITIZATION TO CONTACT SUBSTANCES: DERMATITIS VENENATA, OCCUPATIONAL DERMATITIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Dermatological Service of the Vanderbilt Clinic and the Department of Dermatology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1931;23(2):221-237. doi:10.1001/archderm.1931.03880200011002
Abstract

In spite of much confusion in terminology, most students of dermatology have a fairly definite concept of the type of dermatitis usually referred to in English speaking countries as dermatitis venenata and on the Continent as dermatitis eczematosa artefacta. It includes the eruptions due to plants, antiseptics and cosmetics and most of the occupational dermatoses. They are characterized by their transient character, by their origin at, and usual limitation to, the region where the exciting agent is applied, and as a consequence their frequent occurrence on the hands and face, by their disappearance soon after complete protection from this exciting agent and by the usual absence of residual changes in the skin.

In appearance (and histology) the eruptions vary from that of a severe rhus dermatitis with coalesced vesicles, intense edema and hardly perceptible infiltration, to that of a photographer's dermatitis with marked infiltration, hyperkeratosis and fissuring, and little evidence

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