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Article
April 1931

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO, DIVISION OF DERMATOLOGY OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1931;23(4):773-780. doi:10.1001/archderm.1931.03880220179012

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Abstract

Argyria from Silver Arsphenamine.  A man, aged 53, had a positive Wassermann reaction of the blood five years before admission. Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid was said to have given negative results. He had been treated with neoarsphenamine, and some intragluteal injections had been given. In addition, he had received sixty injections of silver arsphenamine (about 16.5 Gm.) over a period of four years. The skin presented a grayish, metallic tint, most noticeable on the scalp, the face, the neck and the hands. The oral mucous membrane was cyanotic. A grayish tint was present on other parts of the body. The Kolmer, Wassermann and Kahn precipitation reactions of the blood serum were strongly positive. Examination of a microscopic section from the nape of the neck showed granules in the superficial dermis (fig. 1). The granules were insoluble in concentrated acetic acid, ammonium hydroxide and potassium cyanide. They discolored but did

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