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Article
May 1931

TINEA: THE SECOND MOST PREVALENT DISEASE OF THE SKIN

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1931;23(5):872-873. doi:10.1001/archderm.1931.03880230048005
Abstract

The impression has been gaining credence that ringworm infection of the skin has been increasing within the past few years. The increase may now be actual, or cases of tinea may now be diagnosed that in the past were not considered to be due to fungi. It has been interesting to compile the statistics reported from the New York Skin and Cancer Hospital, and their wider publication may be justified.

Tinea was eighth or ninth in the order of incidence of the most common diseases of the skin from 1913 to 1927, inclusive, which was taken in five-year periods, as explained in my previous compilation.1

Epidermophytosis, ringworm of the feet and hands, was almost exactly equivalent to the number of cases of acne for 1928 and 1929.

Routine examinations disclosed some clinical phase of ringworm of the toes in approximately half of the people of postadolescent age in the

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