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Article
May 1931

KERATOMA SENILIS AND VERRUCA SENILIS: A CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Dermatology and Syphilology, the Mayo Foundation ROCHESTER, MINN.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1931;23(5):946-959. doi:10.1001/archderm.1931.03880230122014
Abstract

This study of keratoma senilis (senile keratosis) and verruca senilis (seborrheic keratosis) was undertaken because a definite, clearcut picture of the lesions could not be obtained from a review of the literature on the subject. I have attempted to show that the existing confusion with regard to these common lesions need not exist, that it is important to distinguish one lesion from the other, and that the lesions differ with respect to etiology, clinical and pathologic characteristics and prognosis.

CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS  Keratoma senilis, when fully developed, presents a typical appearance. The lesions appear as sharply circumscribed, flat, elevated or verrucous, brownish, keratotic, scaling patches. They are usually situated on the face, hands and forearms, although they occur elsewhere on the body. Men are affected more often than women, as a rule after middle age and often in association with the changes of senile atrophy. The lesions begin as small, sharply

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